Jones Auto Centers Compares 2022 Ford F-150 VS 2022 Toyota Tundra Near Verde Valley, AZ

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2022 Ford F-150

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2022 Ford F-150

VS
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2022 Toyota Tundra

Safety Comparison

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Full-time four-wheel drive is optional on the F-150. Full-time four-wheel drive gives added traction for safety in all conditions, not just off-road, like the only system available on the Tundra.

The F-150’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Tundra doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the F-150 and the Tundra have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, crash mitigating brakes, post-collision automatic braking systems, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, around view monitors and rear cross-path warning.

For its top level performance in IIHS driver and passenger-side small overlap frontal, moderate overlap frontal, side impact, roof strength and head restraint tests, its standard vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention system, its standard vehicle-to-pedestrian front crash prevention system, and its available headlight’s “Good” rating, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the F-150 the rating of “Top Safety Pick” for 2021, a rating granted to only 145 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Tundra has not been tested, yet.

Warranty Comparison

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There are over 2 times as many Ford dealers as there are Toyota dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the F-150’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

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The F-150 has a standard “limp home system” to keep drivers from being stranded if most or all of the engine’s coolant is lost. The engine will run on only half of its cylinders at a time, reduce its power and light a warning lamp on the dashboard so the driver can get to a service station for repairs. The Tundra doesn’t offer a lost coolant limp home mode, so a coolant leak could strand you or seriously damage the truck’s engine.

Engine Comparison

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The F-150’s 3.0 turbo V6 diesel produces 35 lbs.-ft. more torque (440 vs. 405) than the Tundra SR’s standard 3.4 turbo V6.

As tested in Car and Driver the Ford F-150 V6 hybrid gas is faster than the Toyota Tundra V6 hybrid gas:

F-150

Tundra

Zero to 60 MPH

5.4 sec

5.7 sec

Zero to 100 MPH

13.7 sec

18 sec

5 to 60 MPH Rolling Start

5.9 sec

6.5 sec

Passing 30 to 50 MPH

3.3 sec

3.5 sec

Passing 50 to 70 MPH

4 sec

4.2 sec

Quarter Mile

13.9 sec

14.5 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

101 MPH

92 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

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On the EPA test cycle the F-150 gets better mileage than the Tundra:

MPG

F-150

RWD

3.5 turbo V6 Hybrid

25 city/25 hwy

2.7 turbo V6

20 city/26 hwy

3.3 DOHC V6

19 city/24 hwy

3.5 turbo V6

18 city/24 hwy

AWD

3.0 turbo V6 Diesel

20 city/27 hwy

3.5 turbo V6 Hybrid

23 city/23 hwy

2.7 turbo V6

19 city/24 hwy

3.3 DOHC V6

19 city/22 hwy

3.5 turbo V6

18 city/23 hwy

Tundra

RWD

SR 3.4 turbo V6

18 city/24 hwy

3.4 turbo V6 (389 HP)

18 city/23 hwy

AWD

SR/SR5 3.4 turbo V6

17 city/23 hwy

3.4 turbo V6 (389 HP)

17 city/22 hwy

To lower fuel costs and make buying fuel easier, the Ford F-150 uses regular unleaded gasoline (premium recommended with the 3.5 turbo V6 engine for maximum performance). The Tundra requires premium, which can cost 20 to 55 cents more per gallon.

The F-150 SuperCrew’s standard fuel tank has 3.5 gallons more fuel capacity than the Tundra’s standard fuel tank (26 vs. 22.5 gallons). The F-150’s optional fuel tank has 3.8 gallons more fuel capacity than the Tundra’s optional fuel tank (36 vs. 32.2 gallons).

The F-150 has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Tundra doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Tires and Wheels Comparison

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The F-150’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 70 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Tundra SR’s standard 75 series tires. The F-150 Limited’s tires have a lower 45 series profile than the Tundra Capstone’s 50 series tires.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

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The F-150 has standard front and rear gas-charged shocks for better control over choppy roads. The Tundra base model’s suspension doesn’t offer gas-charged shocks.

The F-150 5.5-foot Lariat SuperCrew 4x4 handles at .72 G’s, while the Tundra 5.5-foot bed TRD Pro Crew Cab Pickup pulls only .71 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

For better maneuverability, the F-150’s turning circle is tighter than the Tundra’s:

F-150

Tundra

Regular Cab Standard Bed

41.2 feet

n/a

Regular Cab Long Bed

46.4 feet

n/a

Extended Cab Standard Bed

47.8 feet

48.6 feet

Crew Cab Short Bed

47.8 feet

48.6 feet

Regular Cab Standard Bed 4x4

41.2 feet

n/a

Extended Cab Standard Bed 4x4

47.8 feet

48.6 feet

Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4

47.8 feet

48.6 feet

Chassis Comparison

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The Ford F-150 may be more efficient, handle and accelerate better because it weighs about 550 to 1050 pounds less than the Toyota Tundra.

The F-150 is shorter than the Tundra, making the F-150 easier to handle, maneuver and park in tight spaces:

F-150

Tundra

Regular Cab Standard Bed

209.1 inches

n/a

Regular Cab Long Bed

227.7 inches

n/a

Extended Cab Standard Bed

231.7 inches

233.6 inches

Crew Cab Short Bed

231.7 inches

233.6 inches

Crew Cab Standard Bed

243.5 inches

245.6 inches

Passenger Space Comparison

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The F-150 SuperCab offers optional seating for 6 passengers; the Tundra can only carry 5.

The F-150 SuperCab has 2.7 inches more front legroom, 1.7 inches more front shoulder room, 1.8 inches more rear headroom, .2 inches more rear legroom, 2.1 inches more rear hip room and 2.7 inches more rear shoulder room than the Tundra Extended Cab Pickup.

The F-150 SuperCrew has 2.7 inches more front legroom, 1.7 inches more front shoulder room, 1.9 inches more rear headroom, 2 inches more rear legroom, 2.1 inches more rear hip room and 3.6 inches more rear shoulder room than the Tundra Crew Cab Pickup.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

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The F-150’s cargo box is larger than the Tundra’s in every dimension:

F-150 SuperCrew

F-150 Regular Cab

Tundra Crew Cab Pickup

Length (short/long)

67.1”/78.9”

78.9”/97.6”

65.6”/77.6”

Max Width

65.2”

65.2”

58.7”

Min Width

50.6”

50.6”

48.7”

Height

21.4”

21.4”

20.9”

The F-150 has stake post holes, to allow the containment of tall, light loads. The Tundra doesn’t offer stake post holes.

Ergonomics Comparison

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The F-150 offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The climate system will also automatically heat or cool the interior. The Tundra doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the F-150’s available exterior PIN entry system. The Tundra doesn’t offer an exterior PIN entry system.

The F-150’s standard speed-sensitive wipers speed up when the vehicle does, so that the driver doesn’t have to continually adjust the speed of the wipers. The Tundra’s standard manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted.

To help drivers avoid possible obstacles, the F-150 offers optional cornering lights to illuminate around corners when the turn signals are activated. The Tundra doesn’t offer cornering lights. The F-150 (except XL/XLT) also offers optional adaptive headlights to illuminate around corners automatically by reading vehicle speed and steering wheel angle.

The F-150 (except XL/XLT/Lariat) offers optional massaging front seats in order to maximize comfort and eliminate fatigue on long trips. Massaging seats aren’t available in the Tundra.

The F-150 (except XL/XLT)’s optional Park Assist can parallel park by itself, with the driver only controlling speed with the brake pedal. The Tundra doesn’t offer an automated parking system.

Recommendations Comparison

© 1999 - 2022 Advanta-STAR Automotive Research. All rights reserved. This vehicle comparison and all of the content in it are provided only by license from Advanta-STAR Automotive Research Corporation of America. If you are not a legally licensed user of this vehicle comparison, it is against federal law to access it, copy it, forward it or use it in any manner whatsoever. Any unauthorized use of this vehicle comparison is a violation of U.S. and international law and is punishable criminally and civilly. TBJVR-HLSAT 162.241.241.35 2022/08/30

The F-150 was chosen as one of Car and Driver’s “Top Five/10Best Trucks” for 2 of the last 6 years. The Tundra has never been a Car and Driver “Top Five/10Best Truck” pick.

Motor Trend selected the F-150 as their 2018 Truck of the Year. The Tundra has never been chosen.

The Ford F-Series outsold the Toyota Tundra by almost 8 to one during the 2021 model year.

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